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>>> does state law allow cities and counties to ban cannabis dispensaries? even though voters approve the use of medical marijuana? >> the legislature knows how to say, thou shalt not ban dispensaries. they didn't say that. >> that's the question before california's highest court this week. the ruling could have a huge impact on the state's massive medical marijuana industry. >>> job growth in silicon valley is outpacing the rest of the nation. but a new report says the income gap between rich and poor is widening. leaving some minorities behind. >>> with the number of people riding bicycles rising fast, san francisco planners roll out a multimillion dollar strategy to add bike lanes, parking stations and other improvements. we'll talk with the head of the san francisco bicycle coalition. >>> plus, california takes the first step to grant special protection to the ocean's top predator. coming up next. >>> good evening, and welcome to "this week in northern california." i'm scott shafer. well, we hoped we'd be talking about this week's super bowl victory parade for the san fran
of oakland residents gathers at a site of a recent murder to protest gun violence in their city. >> stop the violence! stop the violence! do something! >> they call themselves s.a.v.e., an acronym for soldiers against violence everywhere. >> we are soldiers. we're out here in the rain, cold, doing what we do. >> s.a.v.e. was started in 2010 by the pastor at oakland's true vine ministries church after a member of his congregation was shot and killed. >> we sort of took a page from the civil right's movement where they would go to the lunch counters and sit in until they were arrested. so we do stand-ins. we go to the community where someone has been murdered and we go and protest in the community about the violence. >> we are here to support you, let you know that your grandson will never be forgotten. >> i'm here today to support my grandson, aaron, that was killed last month. actually on november 24th. so i'm here to support him to let everyone know that he did have a family. these are our babies. please put these guns away. >> julia ford's grandson was one of oakland's 131 homicide vic
at exorbitant rates -- implement a public finance system based on new york city. it works well in new york city. it will work well in new york state. >> do you think he's serious? >> i do think he's serious. >> how will he prove he's serious? >> well, he'll prove his seriousness by getting this bill passed in the coming legislature. i think we can have confidence that the governor will be able to pass something that is called campaign finance reform in this state. the real test and measure is going to be whether it includes this citizen funding. >> how would public funding work? >> well, it can work a lot of different ways. for obvious reasons it's most useful to point to new york city when you're in new york state. here we have a system in the city if you're running for citywide office or for city council, any contribution up to, you qualify to get into the system, you elect to be in the system, it's voluntary. then any contribution up to $175 is matched six to one -- >> by the public? >> by the public. out of a pool from the general fund from the budget. and that has had a dramatic transforma
city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the captive? >> us, all of us. what's happened is that these enormous telecommunications companies, comcast and time warner on the wired side, verizon and at&t on the wireless side, have divided up markets, put themselves in the position where they're subject to no competition and no oversight from any regulatory authority. and they're charging us a lot for internet access and giving us second class access. this is a lot like the electrification story from the beginning of the 20th century. initially electricity was viewed as a luxury. so when f.d.r. came in, 90% of farms didn't have electricity in america at the same time that kids in new york city were playing with electric toys. and f.d.r. understood how important it was for people all over america to have the dignity and self-respect and sort of cultural and social and economic connection of an electrical outlet in their home. so he made sure to take on the special interests that were controlling elec
't want a pathway that will lead our workers into better high-paying jobs in the city. they're concerned about keeping their workers, picking their crops so they can make a decent profit, what they think is a decent profit. if they don't and i say, there's legalization, they're going to have to pay higher wages and that's going to mean an impact on consumers at the grocery stores. one thing the growers wanted to hear and haven't heard it heretofore, that's an idea of a guest worker program. many people on the conservative front are trying to push this, saying that this is going to stem illegal immigration in the future because you'll have a way that people can come back and forth and the growers can have people picking their crops and everyone's going to be happy. except big labor, a frks lrfl-c community groups are against a program because they find it unseemly and less inhiumane. what if someone comes in and wants citizenship? with the bacero program, if it comes out in the ensuing weeks, you do have something that addresses future immigration and that's something that proponents for
never talked to anybody from new orleans without asking their take on how the city influenced what they do and who they are. whenever you talk to anyone from new orleans, they are willing to admit the music i-- the city has played as much of a role in their musical development. part of it is just being in new orleans. and when you have ever read or talked about, there is a connection, and tell me about how new orleans has factored into your sound. >> music is just in the air. it is not just one kind of music, but you can be playing and all of a sudden you hear the drums, and you do not know what it is. there is a cross brand behind the funeral. all whole lot of people doing the dance, so all of that grows within you, and you grow up with the mark in cross regions -- grow up with marti gras. you follow the beat of the drummer. new orleans is a special place. tavis: did i read somewhere that when you got together to sing, you were i saw hogshead. what was the best you could do? >> the band was already together. and he was a singer, and they recorded a song. a doo-woparted with wh gro
, the more pessimistic we get. proximity confers some legitimacy, to some extent. cities are the laboratories of innovation. laboratories of democracy. but local government, it is the city councils. it is the neighborhoods with and there is. it is the blocked that connect people. that is what i talk about digitizing the town square, using the technology to make sure it is available to everyone. this gives me some optimism. the inability to connect day in and day out with the local government, that is a benefit. >> across the board, in terms of its engagement, one of the critiques against this administration is, like past administrations, they relied too much on this notion that the states can decide. you can see that with no child left behind. states to get to decide. states' rights, rather than bypassing those states and going to municipalities. i have been asking. some people have said, "tavis, i listened to these issues." name one thing that he could have been done differently. sending the money to the states. that money could have gone right to the places where people are hurting the most
grandparents came here about 100 years ago and started having children in new york city. my dad was born in 1915, and everybody is going to notice you have an african american background and you're supposed to be predisposed to playing rhythm, so if you learn to play classically boehner you can really play music. there is no rigid than they know you can really play music. -- if you learn to play classically, then they know you can play music. my father grew up in the era when music was transitioning. everybody was transitioning. he met my mother just after ella fitzgerald had "a tisket a tasket." when they got together, he quit being a composer and a copy of four events -- a copyist for bands. he talked to my mother, and she said, what you want to do? he said, i want a big family. she said, i am a college girl. i want to go back to school and continue my education. he said, that is cool, but let me be able to keep up with the music, and we will be able to have zero albums and a way to play it. -- to have some albums and a way to play it. not hearing music from them, your music from their
of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also be historic. weather forecasters predict it will leave up to three feet of snow in a wide swath stretching from new york to boston. preparations are well underway. airlines cancelled nearly 4,500 flights, leaving many travelers stranded. >> here at laguardia, as you can see, our port authority men and women are hard at work preparing for the storm. our fleet of snow removal vehicles and sand and agent spreaders are prepped and ready for action. >> reporter: amtrak has also canceled many trips in the northeast. the storm is expected to deliver a harsh blow to areas of the east coast still recovering from superstorm sandy. >> hurricane sandy cost the economy a $100 billion and the recovery efforts are still going
of 20 cities posted increases. the lone exception was new york city, where prices dipped a half a percent. there was more data today reaffirming the housing market recovery. new home sales surged almost 16% in january, a lot more than expected and the biggest jump in nearly two decades. so what's behind the turnaround in the housing market? >> the biggest factor is just the fact that prices have fallen to such a level that there are enough willing buyers that see value in this market to come in and basically provide a floor. >> reporter: in fact, investors continue to purchase about nearly one out of every five homes. many real estate experts predict home prices will continue to rise this year, fueled by a dwindling number of properties on the market. in january, the supply of homes for sale fell to its lowest level in nearly eight years. for most people, the biggest impediment to buying a home is not credit score or income. >> it's down payment. most people don't have enough spare cash laying around that they are able to qualify, given today's higher down payment requirements.
the artist known as rodriguez. >> he was a wandering spirit around the city. >> it is a mystery, but it spread quickly. to many of us south africa as he was the soundtrack of our lives. it was the first who opposition to apartheid. he was a mystery. then we found out he committed suicide, and a lot of people have different versions of the story. i thought it would make a good story. there is nothing on the record to tell us who he was or where he was from, so we started to look at the lyrics. we found him. >> he was doing the work nobody else wanted to do he was a lot of things but not materialistic. >> the next day he says, i have got to go on tour, and we said, why is absent -- why is that? >> congratulations in advance. when i saw this story i was blown away. i know some of the real-life characters. i have known them for years. some of the personalities you feature in this documentary, but what i came to know of the story, my first reaction was how a story in this rich could be hidden for so long. it is one of those stories that is right in front of our eyes, but it takes a g
, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why the super bowl blackout means it's time for the cities that host professional sports teams to focus on the basics. >> tom: stocks were back in the green after suffering their biggest sell-off in months yesterday. one encouraging sign came from the service sector. the non-manufacturing index slipped in january from december, but not as much as feared, according to the institute of supply management. the employment index was at its highest level in almost seven years. the dow gained 100, the nasdaq increased 40, the s&p was up almost 16. >> susie: the u.s. government made it official today. it filed a suit against standard and poors' credit agency for giving optimistic ratings on troubled securities that later failed and contributed to the financial crisis. the justice department could seek as much as $5 billion from s&p. it claims that's the amount of money federally insured financial institutions lost because of s&p's alleged wrongdoing. the government claims s&p ratings services knowingly executed a "scheme to defraud investors." >> duri
in the streets of new york city, and 80 people were watching this and nobody did anything. my grandmother could not commute. there was nothing about her generation that could understand how that happens, so we have become anesthetized, and the hope is we continue to get fired up for the truth, and maybe with a character we can get away with a lot more. >> i do not get the impression anybody needs to fire you up. you are pretty much on. all the time. i raise the issue to ask in the right thing or the creating of a character, have you ever come to see the character as a mirror? do you see my point? >> i pray i am quitting acting if i ever have to say to you that i do not. there are many aspects that have nothing to do with me, but there is a core connection, an opportunity to take personal responsibility for some wound or some place i can learn more fun i should be having, because the truth is she is so honest. she is not trying to hide that she is a nightmare. i am impossible. i am not guarded from her flaws. that is very refreshing, as we tend to be very careful about anybody finding us out. ta
high from hosting the super bowl. the city's tourism officials say one million people are in town for the festivities. now, that's more than five times as many people who showed up for the super bowl. new orleans' economy took a big hit when hurricane katrina struck in 2005, but these big turnouts are helping its economic comeback. >> tourism is our most important industry. it's a $5 billion industry for new orleans. it employs 75,000 of our local citizens, so it is absolutely critical that we continue to do events like mardi gras, super bowls, final fours, big conventions, business meetings. that is the lifeblood of the city. >> susie: she also says this year's mardi gras is expected to bring in almost $150 million and that the planning never stops. tomorrow, new orleans will start working on mardi gras 2014. well, that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, february 12. have a great evening, everyone. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.c
this week. plus a curfew to curtail violent protests that have been raised in several egyptian cities. 54 people have died. another warning came from the country's army chief, that's egypt's -- that's egypt's political problems are pushing the near anarchy along the sues canal. in cairo a mob ransacked the fire star intercontinental hotel. it has been two years since mubarak was september from power. the new -- was swept from power. the new present morsi is an islamist aligned with the brotherhood. adding to the unrest is egypt's weak economy. egypt's credit rating was downgraded from a b plus to a b. it cited instability. the urgency of egypt's climate brought leaders of all political stripes in a rare meeting tuesday. included were the muslim brotherhood. the shroff if is and secular and bib brail faxes, including mohammed el bar day and his national front. the group issued a statement calling for national dialogue, one that quote all the components of the egyptian society participate without any exclusion, unquote. as quote the only means to resolve any problems or disagreements unquot
and what to do about it." he's now a visiting professor at the new school here in new york city where he's teaching a special course on the financial crash. welcome, richard wolff. >> thank you, bill. >> last night i watched for the second time the popular lecture that is on this dvd, "capitalism hits the fan." tell us why you say capitalism has hit the fan. >> well, the classic defense of capitalism as a system for much of its history has been, okay, it has this or that flaw. but it "delivers the goods." >> yeah, for most everybody. >> right. >> that was the argument. >> and so you may not get the most, but it'll trickle down to you, all the different ways. >> the yachts will rise. >> that's right. the ocean will lift all the boats. the reality is that for at least 30 years now, that isn't true. for the majority of people, capitalism is not delivering the goods. it is delivering, arguably, the bads. and so we have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, but a growing majority in this society which isn't gettin
, cities, to last. siemens. answers. >>> issue one. drone on. >> drones are uavs. unmanned aerial vehicles. aircraft that are operated remotely from nearby or from thousands of miles away, like the distance between the nation of afghanistan and the air force base in the u.s. state of nevada. drones come in various shapes, sizes and weights. they are used for surveillance, disablement, and killing. and drones are increasingly ubiquitous. there are 64 drone bases spread across the united states alone, and the u.s. has other drone installations across the planet. africa is increasingly a drone base environment. a newly authorized site in the nation of niger will become the sixth u.s. drone base in africa, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just deci
background special effect graphic that abeard to depict an american city destroyed by a nuclear strike. >> why would they build an p intercontinental ballistic missile could go 6000 miles when sowl south korea is 25 miles from the border. >> they had another test about six weeks ago. >> they tested the missile and put a satellite into orbit. they tested a device. >> nuclear arms reduction. >> america will continue to lead the effort to prevent the spread of the world's most dangerous weapons. at the same time, will engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenals and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into wrong lands. >> so how many nuclear weapons does the president want to reduce? of the 1700 nuclear weapons the u.s. now possesses, the white house believes 1000 to 1100 warheads would provide an equal level of security. >> under one scenario is 1000 war leads to lower thresholds to maintain a capable nuclear deterrent. >>> if we have to blow-up more than one p planet we might need more than 1000 nuclear warheads. >> is this
, maybe two. peak travel to key cities could be snarled by late march. smaller airports may have to shut down altogether. you can find the list on the department of transportation's website. the administration denies these announcements are part of a campaign to pressure house republicans to change course and head off the cuts. >> the idea that we are doing this to create some kind of horrific scare tactic is nonsense. we are required to cut a billion dollars. and if more than half of our employees are at the f.a.a., the f.a.a.-- there has to be some impact. >> reporter: and the f.a.a. cuts don't include potential delays from cutbacks as t.s.a. furloughs employees. the defense department has already informed 800,000 workers they may be furloughed and face a 20% paycut as it struggles to find a way to cut $46 billion from its budget. adding it all up, the president warns the picture is not pretty. >> the overall impact to the recovery will be to slow down the recovery. and not only may there end up being direct job loss, but, because the economy is softer, it also means that we're not goi
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)